Elektrobit, Jaguar Land Rover suggest Plug & Play automotive network: Page 2 of 3

October 03, 2016 // By Julien Happich
In a joint presentation at IEEE-SA's Ethernet & IP @ Automotive Technology Day, Michael Ziehensack (Elektrobit) and Hari Parmar (Jaguar Land Rover) shared their views on how a scalable and flexible E/E network should look like in the future.

"Such a network should automatically update itself when functions or ECUs are moved around the car", he said, introducing the Automotive Plug & Play network.

The Automotive Plug & Play network he described would consist of a scalable network architecture made up of structured network and platform components, integrating an Ethernet backbone with redundant links, smart Ethernet switches, remote IO devices for access to all the end nodes, together with a scalable computing platform. Using software, this hardware part of the network would translate into a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), where every discrete function would be represented as a service (to be combined into more complex services) used by apps to provide certain vehicle features such as ACC, climate control, engine control… In that context, services and apps would use a middleware for automated discovery and interaction, to show their availability or to exchange their IP addresses, UDP/TCP ports.


Four key components for the Automotive Plug & Play network.

In learning mode, the switches and end nodes (switch forwarding tables, address assignment, VLANs, ARP table, bandwidth allocations, master clock and port roles etc..) would be automatically configured using plug & play protocols adapted from the IT industry, then the network configuration would be frozen before being fully tested. The freeze part is necessary to protect the configuration against undesired changes, the plug & play protocols are disabled and the network configuration is stored so it can operates reliably in a stable manner.


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